Are Beer Growlers Recyclable?

Are Beer Growlers Recyclable?

Have you ever brought a beer growler to your local brewery to fill up with fresh beer? In the last few years, the sale of these refillable containers has increased. And now that it’s summertime, more people are out and about enjoying their favorite brews.

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But have you ever wondered if these growlers are recyclable? The answer is yes! Growlers are made of glass or aluminum and can be recycled like bottles and cans. Just make sure you empty them first before recycling them. 

The Top 10 Ways to Recycle Your Beer Growlers

Beer growlers can be used over and over again to transport draft beer from the brewery or bar to your home, but there comes a time when your growler will be looking a little worse for wear.

The good news is that once they’ve had their day, there are plenty of things you can do with your old beer growlers that don’t involve filling them with suds ever again! Take advantage of the creative uses listed below and discover some new ways to help the environment while saving some cash as well!

1) Use as DIY storage containers

In a perfect world, beer growlers would never find their way into landfills. But since we don’t live in that perfect world and recycling rates are just hovering above 50%, it might be time to think of new ways to repurpose that empty brown bottle.

Some folks have filled up growlers with glass marbles and used them as drink coasters; others use their empty containers as flower vases or storage containers for candy, pasta or other small kitchen staples.

2) Create a terrarium

While it might not seem like much at first, a small terrarium can be a nice addition to any kitchen countertop. While terrariums are traditionally used for display and aesthetic value, they also serve a purpose.

A miniature ecosystem within your own home that requires no care or maintenance? Sounds pretty good. To get started, you’ll need to head over to Lowe’s or another hardware store that sells supplies like sand and pebbles.

From there, simply follow these simple steps:

1) Buy your supplies

2) Put rocks in bowl

3) Fill with sand

4) Put plants in bowl

5) Enjoy watching plants grow for months.

And if you ever want more plants? Just go back out and buy more supplies!

3) Plant them with succulents

A great way to give your succulents a nice home while also recycling something you use at least twice a week is by planting them in an old beer growler. A perfect match, right? Here’s how: Cut out any logos or printing on it first and clean out any debris that might be stuck inside of it with some warm water.

Pour sand into a plastic bag and seal it shut so that you have a little bucket full of sand ready for filling up your container.

Now put one plant in there, cover him with more sand, and repeat until he’s surrounded by all his little friends. You don’t need much soil for succulents because they can retain moisture quite well on their own!

4) Turn them into funnels for any beverage you like

Whether it’s olive oil, vinegar, or something else entirely, bottles with narrow necks are perfect for storing a variety of liquids. You can either use them as-is or you can drill small holes into their caps.

If you have an old growler that’s missing its top and you don’t plan on drinking out of it again, you could also try using polyurethane glue to attach a screw-on lid in place of its missing one. This way it should still be able to store liquid without leaking.

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5) Use as mini-kegs for homebrewers

Homebrewers can use beer growlers as a mini keg for homebrew. Mini kegs are not only more portable than 5-gallon (19 l) stainless steel kegs, but they also allow more control over carbonation, provide an attractive dispensing device, and eliminate almost all of your cleaning time.

The process is simple: take out all of your beer and clean and sanitize everything thoroughly. Fill your growler with water up to where you want it filled with beer (leave 1 inch/2.5 cm or so empty), add two drops of liquid dish soap, and shake vigorously.

This will remove any residue in your container that could give a bad flavor if left there during fermentation.

6) Craft them into drinking glasses

Before you recycle a beer growler, check if your state has special recycling laws and regulations. Some states allow them in curbside recycling, but only if they’re empty (so make sure to clean out that beer!). In other states, you’ll need to return them directly back to your local brewpub or brewery.

You can always reuse beer growlers as drinking glasses—but it may take a little more work. To reuse a growler as an actual drinking glass, try these steps: First, remove any stickers on both sides of the growler. Then wash it thoroughly with hot water and soap using a bottle brush.

7) Decorate them with paint or glitter

This is one of those awesome things you’ll probably do once a year when you fill your growler. When it’s not being used, cover it with some fun colors.

You can go all out with multiple colors or just a simple pattern. It’s up to you, but if you want something long-lasting try spray paint designed for glass. This will give your growler long-lasting durability and great looks.

There are also tons of craft stores that carry glitter sprays in different colors so you can create whatever design fits your tastes best!

8) Fill with coffee beans as air freshener

Coffee beans offer a pleasant smell, and they’re also edible. To fill your growler with coffee beans: Make sure you clean out your growler, then wash it well.

Open it wide and give it a sniff—if it still smells like beer, you should rinse it again. Then put about 2/3 cup of dry roasted coffee beans in there. Screw on the lid securely, but not tightly—the air will push out as carbon dioxide fills up inside.

Place your growler in a well-ventilated area near an open window or door for 24 hours so that some of the carbon dioxide can escape without opening it up entirely. It should be pretty smelly when you open it at that point!

9) Stuff them with fire starter logs for camping trips

If you have some empty beer growlers sitting around, consider stacking them up on your bookshelf. It’s a good way to show off what you drink and it makes for a unique decoration in your house.

Just don’t stack them too high: Once they start wobbling over time, they could easily fall down and shatter (which is never good). If that happens, it’s OK: You can still recycle them.

Actually, given how intricate beer growler designs are becoming these days, there’s always a chance you could break or lose one of your originals so having replacements is nice.

10) Stack them up on your bookshelf

If you’re a beer growler collector, chances are you want to show off your collection. One option is to stack your empty growlers up on your bookshelf.

Don’t worry about making them look perfect or matching them up perfectly with their labels facing out – you can stack them in any arrangement as long as they’re stable and don’t fall over.

It’s a cool way to showcase what types of beer styles you prefer (e.g., dark IPAs versus pale ales) and also makes for a nice conversation piece when friends come over. You can use wood crates, wood slices, and even funnels for easy stacking.

Final Word

Plastic growlers are a great way to take home beer after a day at your favorite brewery, but what do you do with them once they’re empty? Most breweries will refill them for you if you bring them back, but many people don’t want to make that trip twice.

Fortunately, there are plenty of other things you can use your empty growler for! While each item on our list requires a slightly different approach, all have one thing in common: they allow us to continue using our awesome bottles as long as possible before recycling.

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Devin

I'm Devin. I'm a wine enthusiast, researcher, and writer. I love to write about various topics during my free time, but when I'm not working you can find me traveling the world or reading, watching movies, or swimming.

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